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Rise & Fall of Apartheid: Photography and the Bureaucracy of Everyday Life Exhibition

   

Journals  |  Cape Town  |  Rise & Fall of Apartheid: Photography and the Bureaucracy of Everyday Life Exhibition

Cape Town
Jun 23, 2019
I’ve lived in Johannesburg for over 3 years now, and have encountered thousands of stories about apartheid and the effects of it that still permeates through the country. In my time here, I’ve had the chance to speak to people who were at the forefront of the struggle (we’re talking ...

I’ve lived in Johannesburg for over 3 years now, and have encountered thousands of stories about apartheid and the effects of it that still permeates through the country.

In my time here, I’ve had the chance to speak to people who were at the forefront of the struggle (we’re talking primo freedom fighters here), to vibrant teenagers who are what is called “Born Free”. Each story has a different perspective and absolute telling of what this country once was, and what it is today; inspiration (according to the city index survey on the 50 most inspirational places, Johannesburg made #2).

If you’re a visual person like myself, nothing drives a story home more than images. Hosted at Museum Africa in Newton, this exhibition is a full visual account of the vast difference in life in South Africa during, and after The Rainbow Nation’s most infamous battle.

This exhibition brought me to tears- Maybe I’m too sensitive- or maybe it’s just that powerful. A highly recommended to-do if you’re visiting Johannesburg. The exhibition has been extended until April 30, 2015.

Created by the IFC, Curated by Okwui Enwezor & Rory Bester

This edition of the exhibition is brought to Johannesburg by the South African Department of Arts & Culture and the Ford Foundation, supported by the City of Johannesburg, Museum Africa, the European Union, the Goethe-Institute, the Austrian Embassy, the British Council, EUNIC, the German Embassy, the French Institute of South Africa, the Swiss Embassy, and the University of Witwatersrand.

SOUTH AFRICA Sept 23, 1989: Right-wing Afrikaners at Church Square in downtown Pretoria, northern Transvaal (now Limpopo Province) (Photo by Greg Marinovich)

From the organizers: Rise and Fall of Apartheid: Photography and the Bureaucracy of Everyday Life is a photographic exhibition examining the legacy of the apartheid system and how it penetrated even the most mundane aspects of social existence in South Africa, from housing, public amenities, transportation, to education, tourism, religion, and businesses.

Complex, vivid, evocative, and dramatic, it includes nearly 500 photographs, films, books, magazines, newspapers, and assorted archival documents and covers more than 60 years of powerful photographic and visual production that form part of the historical record of South Africa.

Several photographic strategies, from documentary to reportage, social documentary to the photo essay, were each adopted to examine the effects and after-effects of apartheid’s political social, economic, and cultural legacy.

Curated by Okwui Enwezor with Rory Bester, the exhibition proposes a complex understanding of photography and the aesthetic powers of the documentary form and honours the exceptional achievements of South African photographers.

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